Work continues on the 1937 Barbour work boat. We are completing the caulking of the seams on the planking and putting paint on the boat. This week we lowered the boat a bit and began work on replacing the original deck with a new Plywood and Dynel deck, which will make the boat much stiffer. The first step is to remove the old deck and reinforce the deck beam structure. Once that is complete, we will be cutting out and applying a half-inch marine grade fir plywood and then covering that with Dynel, a material treated just like Fiberglass but when complete will appear to be a canvas covered deck. This material should only be applied over plywood, which is stable enough and won't move or swell. Once the deck is on we will be moving on to construction of the deck house. Meanwhile, we have arranged with a new volunteer to...

If you haven't yet, make sure to check out our new raffle boat in the lobby of the museum. This year our Friends group is offering a sailboat called a Moth. This 11-foot racer promises to be a real rocket. The Classic Moth is a developmental class that was started right here in N.C. in the 1920s by a sea captain and a boat builder in Washington, N.C. In this class there are just a few parameters which make it a Moth: The boat must be 11-feet long and have a beam of 5 feet. It can't weigh less then 75 pounds and must carry 72 square feet of sail. Other then that a Moth can look any way the designed/builder chooses. This boat meets all these requirements and was designed by our volunteers and staff at the Watercraft Center. She's really hot, and worth checking out — and buying a...

Like any nonprofit, we could not accomplish nearly all that we do without the help of a team of dedicated volunteers. All those awesome boat building projects? Completed with the help of our skilled volunteers. Our ability to showcase a working watercraft center? Impossible without the volunteers here working on projects. Even the plaques we gave out today to recognize the Volunteers of the Year from the Watercraft Center, Maritime Museum, our Friends group, the Junior Sailing Program and Bonehenge Whale Center? Built by a volunteer — a volunteer who, coincidentally, was our top volunteer of the year. William Shrader was named the Watercraft Center Volunteer of the Year. He was recognized by center Manager Grant Caraway for not just helping out but helping out on the less glamorous parts of boat building and restorations: painting and scraping and sharpening tools. Congratulations, Will! A second volunteer was recognized with an award specific to...

We are in mid winter-mode in the Watercraft Center and working on several interesting projects. One is the restoration of our old 28-foot Barbour Work Boat, circa 1937. We are Several months into the restoration of the boat, which is new to our collection. We started work in October. Right off the bat it was evident that the stem and several planks on the forward starboard side below the waterline needed replacement. It looked as though the boat had been damaged in that area at some point and the repair was less then adequate. So our first plan of attack was to replace the stem and several planks on both sides forward below the water line. We also refastened the whole boat as best we could. And we removed the cabin house, which was obviously not original (or correct).  [gallery columns="2" ids="2690,2686,2689,2691"] Currently, we have completed that work and are in the process of...

Grant Caraway, manager of the Harvey W, Smith Watercraft Center attended the 31st annual Antique and Classic boat festival on June 15-17 2018. The show was hosted by the Chesapeake chapter of the Antique and Classic Boat Society. The show takes place on the beautiful campus of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels. This is a top-rated antique boat show that has over 60 exhibitors and nearly 100 boats including several in-water boats, drawing participants from 9 different states. The weekend consisted of seminars and educational outreach promoting classic boat history and industry. Grant entered a 1952 Barbour racer which is part of the collection here at the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort. The boat was built by the owner of Barbour Boats in New Bern NC for his grandson to race in the ACBS circuit of the 1950s. The racer was powered by a Mercury Super 20hp...

Would you spend $5 to win a 1907 tender replica from the yacht “Black Wing”? Lots of people did during the last year as they visited the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort. As with most raffles, there can only be one winner. This year, Lyn Knoke from Minnesota won the boat valued at $8,500. In addition to the 12’5” boat, the winner also received a 2014 Tohatsu 6 hp 4-Stroke motor. The replica boat was built at the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center, across the street from the North Carolina Maritime Museum, by the volunteers and staff of the Museum. Museum staff member and boat builder Tim White selected the design for the 2016 boat. “It’s the first time we had built a motor boat for the raffle,” he said. “We wanted to do something different since the staff and volunteers historically build sailboats,” stated Mr. White. The original boat was designed...